Union Label Week is September 7-13

Labor Day falls on September 7, 2015, this year, and is also the day in history when the United States got its nickname Uncle Sam. “Uncle Sam” is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812. Wilson (1766-1854) stamped the barrels with “U.S.” for United States, but soldiers began referring to the grub as “Uncle Sam’s.” The local newspaper picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained widespread acceptance as the nickname for the U.S. federal government. Labor Day made its mark in U.S. history around the same time 70 years later, evolving, much like Uncle Sam, into a national symbol. While, Uncle Sam is the personification of the U.S. and is generally regarded as a patriotic symbol, Labor Day symbolizes the power of the U.S. worker and the hard work undertaken to achieve the eight-hour day, a 40-hour work week, a fair wage, and a path to the middle class. Both are a tribute to our nation in their own way and while Uncle Sam is a product directly of war, there were countless battles fought to achieve Labor Day. We can’t forget those hard fought battles. We must honor the promise of a better future long sought by our founding union brothers and sisters. This Labor Day, we must resolve to look for the Union Label, to seek providers of union services in hotels and restaurants and post offices. And we must take action, like they did, to fight back against the employers who would destroy our...
American Labor Movement to Donate Fasanella’s “Corner Butcher” to Smithsonian

American Labor Movement to Donate Fasanella’s “Corner Butcher” to Smithsonian

Former union organizer and famed artist Ralph Fasanella (1914-1997) painted hundreds of canvases depicting urban working life during the post World War II America. Fasanella was born in the Bronx and grew up in the working-class neighborhoods of New York. As an organizer he advocated for worker’s rights. His passion for social justice showed through his colorful and vibrant paintings.

NLRB Rules Employer Can Not Say Union Could Hurt Business

NLRB Rules Employer Can Not Say Union Could Hurt Business

The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that an employer who warned workers before a labor election that getting a union could hurt business was making an illegal “veiled threat.”

In a 2-1 decision the three-member panel of the board said Tim Krise—the vice president of Student Transportation of America Inc, a Bristol, Penn., school bus company—violated the rights his employees when he reportedly told them that the company could “walk away” from its contract with the Bristol Township if operations became “too costly.”

President Obama, Don’t Sign Trade Promotion Authority

President Obama has Fast Track Authority legislation in hand this will empower him to rush the Trans Pacific Partnership, a massive trade deal, through Congress to an up or down vote. And other trade deals lurk nearby. But he can disprove Lord Acton’s aphorism, absolute power in this case, need not corrupt the legislative process. He has the power, yet he can refuse to use it. Don’t sign the fast track legislation, President Obama. It’s an unlikely scenario, but let’s consider its virtues. If President Obama does not sign the Fast Track Authority legislation, he reserves the right to do so later. By refusing to sign it, he retains the support of progressives, labor, environmentalists, consumer protection groups and more. Sign it and watch the coalition that elected him dissolve. If his only concern is personal, his legacy, he may not care. If he cares about the Democratic party, he should think twice. As for his legacy, wait and see as it pertains to jobs and the middle class. He claims that TPP is good for the U.S. economy, including workers. His claim flies in the face of history. Millions of jobs were lost under NAFTA, the WTO and other similar trade deals, for example, under the Korea agreement, Korean auto exports to the U.S. have soared to more than 1.3 million cars annually while the U.S. auto exports to Korea are a paltry 38,000 a year. An implicit acknowledgement of the high cost trade pacts exact in jobs is the administration’s side deal with Republicans to pass a watered-down, underfunded Trade Adjustment Assistance measure. TAA is supposed to...

Pin It on Pinterest