HILTON Albany Added to Boycott List

HILTON Albany Added to Boycott List

On October 16, 2017, AFL-CIO Sectary-Treasurer Shuler approved a request from UNITE HERE President D. Taylor to add Hilton Albany to the AFL-CIO official Boycott List.

In accordance with the policy on boycott endorsements adopted by the AFL-CIO Executive Council, the Federation will maintain this boycott on its published boycott list for up to one year from the date of endorsement, unless UNITE HERE requests an earlier termination of the listing. At the end of one year, the union may request to have the Hilton Albany continue to be included on the list for another 12 months.

Union Label and Service Trades Dept. Privacy Policy

Last updated: September 1, 2017

The Union Label and Service Trades Department (“us”, “we”, or “our”) operates http://www.unionlabel.org (the “Site”). This page informs you of our policies regarding the collection, use and disclosure of Personal Information we receive from users of the Site.

We use your Personal Information only for providing and improving the Site. By using the Site, you agree to the collection and use of information in accordance with this policy.

Information Collection And Use

While using our Site, we may ask you to provide us with certain personally identifiable information that can be used to contact or identify you. Personally, identifiable information may include, but is not limited to your name (“Personal Information”).

Log Data

Like many site operators, we collect information that your browser sends whenever you visit our Site (“Log Data”).

This Log Data may include information such as your computer’s Internet Protocol (“IP”) address, browser type, browser version, the pages of our Site that you visit, the time and date of your visit, the time spent on those pages and other statistics.

In addition, we may use third party services such as Google Analytics that collect, monitor and analyze this …

Communications

We may use your Personal Information to contact you with newsletters and other electronic materials that you may find useful. You may choose to opt out of receiving communications from us at anytime by using the “unsubscribe” button at bottom of all communications from us.

Cookies

Cookies are files with small amount of data, which may include an anonymous unique identifier. Cookies are sent to your browser from a web site and stored on your computer’s hard drive.

Like many sites, we use “cookies” to collect information. You can instruct your browser to refuse all cookies or to indicate when a cookie is being sent. However, if you do not accept cookies, you may not be able to use some portions of our Site.

Security

The security of your Personal Information is important to us, but remember that no method of transmission over the Internet, or method of electronic storage, is 100% secure. While we strive to use commercially acceptable means to protect your Personal Information, we cannot guarantee its absolute security.

Changes to this Privacy Policy

This Privacy Policy is effective as of September 1, 2017 and will remain in effect except with respect to any changes in its provisions in the future, which will be in effect immediately after being posted on this page.

We reserve the right to update or change our Privacy Policy at any time and you should check this Privacy Policy periodically. Your continued use of the Service after we post any modifications to the Privacy Policy on this page will constitute your acknowledgment of the modifications and your consent to abide and be bound by the modified Privacy Policy.

If we make any material changes to this Privacy Policy, we will notify you either through the email address you have provided us, or by placing a prominent notice on our website

Contact Us

If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, please contact us.

Union Label Week is September 4-10 and  Labor Day

Union Label Week is September 4-10 and Labor Day

Labor Day falls on September 4, 2017, this year, and is also the day in history when the United States got its nickname Uncle Sam.

“Uncle Sam” is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812. Wilson (1766-­‐1854) stamped the barrels with “U.S.” for United States, but soldiers began referring to the grub as “Uncle Sam’s.” The local newspaper picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained widespread acceptance as the nickname for the U.S. federal government.

Labor Day made its mark in U.S. history around the same time 70 years later, evolving, much like Uncle Sam, into a national symbol.

While, Uncle Sam is the personification of the U.S. and is generally regarded as a patriotic symbol, Labor Day symbolizes the power of the U.S. worker and the hard work undertaken to achieve the eight-­‐hour day, a 40-­‐hour work week, a fair wage, and a path to the middle class.

Both are a tribute to our nation in their own way and while Uncle Sam is a product directly of war, there were countless battles fought to achieve Labor Day.

We can’t forget those hard fought battles. We must honor the promise of a better future long sought by our founding union brothers and sisters. This Labor Day, we must resolve to look for the Union Label, to seek providers of union services in hotels and restaurants and post offices.

And we must take action, like they did, to fight back against the employers who would destroy our unions, who choose to move our jobs overseas. We must honor boycotts and picket lines and we need to help our brothers and sisters who are looking to organize a union in their workplace.

Just as important, we have to call for policies at every level of government that do the same. Our government should buy American products and services the same way foreign nations patronize theirs. Our government should fight for the rights of workers seeking a collective voice in their workplace.

We must remind everyone that we strengthened the United States and we built its middle class.

We face a challenge and an opportunity this year to support both union-­‐made goods

and services and expand the ideals of unionism to all Americans. This Labor Day buy union and shop union.

From Labor Day, Monday, September 4, through Sunday September 10, 2017 American labor will observe Union Label Week—the time traditionally set aside for union families and all consumers to make a special effort to support good jobs by looking for union-­‐made goods and union-­produced services when they shop.

Labor Day differs in every essential way from the other holidays of the year in any country. All other holidays are in a more or less degree connected with conflicts and battles of man’s prowess over man, of strife and discord for greed and power, of glories achieved by one nation over another. Labor Day…is devoted to no man, living or dead, to no sect, race, or nation.

-­‐-­‐ Samuel Gompers, founder and longtime president of the American Federation of Labor

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