Spotlight the Label: Allied Printing Trades Council

Spotlight the Label: Allied Printing Trades Council

Look for and ask for the International Allied Printing Trades Council label—the familiar “bug”—on all printed material.

The bug is your assurance of quality and craftsmanship. The bug also guar-antees that the men and women who work on your printed materials receive decent wages and benefits in plants that practice responsible labor-management relations. The label must include the city name and number identifying the exact union printing plant where the work was produced.

The Allied Printing Trades Council is made up of the Printing, Publishing, and Media Workers Sector (PPMWS) of the Communications Workers of America and the Graphic Communications Conference (GCC) a division of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Both the GCC and the PPMWS have distinct labels identifying the shop at which the materials were printed. ■

Patrick Benhene SUPER SHUTTLE DRIVER, THURGOOD MARSHALL BALTIMORE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT FUTURE MEMBER, UFCW LOCAL 1994 (MARYLAND)

Patrick Benhene SUPER SHUTTLE DRIVER, THURGOOD MARSHALL BALTIMORE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT FUTURE MEMBER, UFCW LOCAL 1994 (MARYLAND)

Patrick Benhene

Patrick Benhene

In 2006, after losing a job as an IT professional, a friend suggested I try to get a job with Super Shuttle. I applied and received my “franchise” license. Of course, it’s not really a franchise – I can’t sell it to anyone and once you’ve paid them back for your license, you have nothing to show for it, not even an ownership certificate. On the other hand, Super Shuttle can sell as many of their licenses as they want – no limit for them, making our licenses mean nothing. We can end up sitting in the airport 15-18 hours a day. We have to pay them fees for our license; we have to pay them insurance; and, we have to pay gas and tolls. At the end of the week, we end up with nothing to show for our work. It became too much. When we brought our problems to the attention of Super Shuttle, they just didn’t listen. They say we’re independent contractors, but we’re not.

We got a lawyer and organized ourselves. In our first attempt to make changes a few years ago, the NLRB failed to decide anything meaningful for us. This time, our lawyer contacted the union. Around 80 or 90 percent of our drivers have signed authorization cards and the NLRB is hearing arguments on whether we’re “contractors.” Hopefully, we’ll get our election soon.


Benhene and his fellow Super Shuttle drivers at BWI and nearby Reagan National Airport in Washington DC have filed for union recognition under UFCW Local 1994. Remarkably, they’ve mobilized nearly 90 percent of their fellow drivers to sign authorization cards. Benhene is a U.S. citizen who immigrated from Africa 16 years ago.

AFL-CIO Affiliated Union’s Officers Support Federal Trasportion Security Officers

In a March 30, 2012 letter addressed to President Obama officers from AFL-CIO and its affiliated unions urged the Obama Administration to confrer on TSO full collective bargaining rights with a binding grievance and arbitration procedure similar to the rights of other federal employees.

Transportation Security Officers (TSO) overwhelmingly voted to join the American Federation of Government Employees, AFGE in June 2011.

TSO has been in bargaining with the Transportation Security Administration for close to a year since the election, the parties have still not reached an agreement on a contract.

The letter was signed by 37 eleted officers of affiliated unions and department heads of the AFL-CIO.

Download “Letter TSO Obama” document13.pdf – Downloaded 255 times – 35 KB

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